MEMORIES FROM THE ROAD

Everyone has a story that stems from a car, it’s just a matter whether it gets told. Such tales can be as lighthearted as making funny faces from your childhood family station wagon’s rear-facing seat, or checking out that cute girl or guy in the next car (mostly) safe from your parent’s teasing. Or how about learning how to drive a manual transmission in that old farm truck – then later discovering not every vehicle’s shifter simulates churning butter when shifting gears. Or the defining moment when you hear, see or drive that one car that stirred you, leaving you longing for more. Whatever your connection to cars may be, we hope a few of our reader’s stories will inspire your own trip down memory lane.

Darold Mulvaine was riding the Fast and Furious movie wave and feeling inspired to modify his own ride when he connected with like-minded people on a local Facebook group.  During one of the OG 231Tune Crew meets is when Darold discovered and drove what would then be his dream car, a Honda AP1 S2000. “The car was Silverstone Silver over a red interior,” he reminisced. “I felt an instant connection to the car when I fell into that driver’s bucket seat. I knew without a shadow of a doubt that it was something special. One day, I would own one. Turn the key, clutch in, push the big red ‘START’ button, and off we went. Being that it was another man’s automobile, I was cautious. The sun was out, top was down and I was happy to enjoy the moment. But the owner wasn’t having it; “Go on man, get on it!” Who am I to argue with that? I dropped from sixth gear into third and hit four-thousand RPMs and climbed… Five-thousand… Six-thousand… Then the VTEC crossover hit. I never felt anything like it. The engine screamed toward nine-thousand RPMs, feeling like it would climb forever, and just after a few short seconds it was time to hit the brakes.”

The car was sold just a couple months after Darold’s experience, but he never forgot it. Ten years later he purchased his own AP1 S2000 and relives the aforementioned excitement every time he drives.

Hawk Hawkins gets his enjoyment from the slow lane. “There’s really nothing better than taking a slowpoke ride on a beautiful summer afternoon with my best friend and wife of over 32 years,” he said. “It helps us to slow down and enjoy the scenery and each other’s company without the distractions of modern life.  We step back to when time wasn’t in such a hurry, when life was focused on the quality – not quantity – of experiences you can fit in a day. A 1928 Ford Model A Roadster allows…” Hawk paused to clear his throat; “Er, forces me to do just that. A stock Model A just can’t go very fast, there isn’t a radio, and every shift takes more concentration.  Driving this car forces me and my wife to appreciate living in the moment together. This car and a beautiful Sunday afternoon didn’t bring us love, but it certainly reinforced what we already have.”


Speaking of love, the Odells eloped in a 1968 Ford Mustang GT/CS. You couldn’t ask for a more perfect combination: two California kid newlyweds driving a California Special up the California coast. “We had a blue Mustang under blue skies in mid-May,” Tim reflected, laying out the scene. “We drove from the Temecula wine country to San Francisco, stopping at small bed-and-breakfasts in Santa Barbara, Morrow Bay and Carmel by The Sea. Some stretches of the central coast by Cambria were impossibly beautiful. I swear the cows living on those grassy hills live better than most humans…”

“Oh, right, the car.,” Tim joked, then leaked the details about his dad’s GT. The Shelby-esque bodywork looks tough, but for Tim, the car was more of a cruiser with its 302-cid small-block engine and automatic transmission. However, the relaxed vibe combined with the car’s power disc brakes and A/C made it a comfortable, eye-catching car for their trip. Tim agrees that there’s no better way to spend a week behind the wheel than driving Hwy 1 up the California Coast.

Did one of the above stories inspire yours? We want to hear from you!

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